Lightroom Quick Tip: Finding Your Missing Panel

About once a week I get an email from a Lightroom user who has lost a panel … most panels can go missing, but in my experience people seem to lose their Catalog panel in the Library module more than any other. To recover your missing panel, right-click (Ctl-click on a Mac) on the name of an existing panel in the same strip, and choose the panel you are missing, from the drop-down that appears. In this example, my Catalog panel is missing. I right-clicked on Folders to get the menu. I would then select Catalog, and the panel would appear.   Note that there are some panels that are not optional, and therefore you cannot right-click on them to [...more]

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Video: Overview of Lightroom’s Output Modules – Book, Slideshow, Web and Print

In this video tutorial, I give you an overview of Lightroom’s output modules, to give you an idea of what you can do with each. This is video #2 in my 12 hour series of 55 videos, Lightroom 4: Producing Great Output (A Workshop on Video) , available on DVD or by download. The series goes into detail on how to use each of the output modules, and also covers critical output concepts, such as monitor calibration and other color management topics, size and resolution, output sharpening, and much more. For higher quality, after you click on the Play button, click on the sprocket wheel symbol in the bottom right and choose 720 HD. Read more about Producing Great Output [...more]

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Sharpening in Lightroom Part Three: Output Sharpening

In this third article of a three-part series on sharpening in Lightroom, I explain output sharpening.  Here are the other two articles:   Part 1: Overview of the Three Step Sharpening workflow, and Capture Sharpening in Depth Part 2: Creative Sharpening – Sharpening Eyes and Other Local Elements To summarize the first two steps in the sharpening workflow, the first step, capture sharpening, is performed on your full size image in the Develop module, and is designed to cut through the haze that a digital capture produces, and make edges in your photos look crisper. Creative sharpening is then sometimes done to enhance or  bring focus to local elements in your photo. Output Sharpening — What It’s For When you [...more]

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A Most Useful Lightroom Shortcut for Viewing Images Full Screen

While I know a fair amount about Lightroom, I am always picking up more from my fellow bloggers.  Here’s a quick but useful shortcut  from Sean McCormack over at Lightroom-Blog.com:  To see your image and nothing but your image, type Shift-Ctl-F on the PC, or Shift-Cmd-F on the Mac.  This will hide the surrounding panels, menu bars, tool bars and system task bars, and your image will be displayed as close to full-screen-size as possible .  While in this view, you can use your left and right arrow keys to scroll to other images.  This shortcut works in all modules, and your other module shortcut keys will continue to work, such as 0-5 for stars and P for Pick/X for [...more]

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Build a Professional Looking Website Completely in Lightroom without Breaking the Bank!

Last week Lightroom guru  Sean McCormack released a new web engine plug-in, LRB Exhibition.  I have to say, I am impressed — in less than an hour I was able to use Lightroom to create a complete website that I would not hesitate to show someone who might  judge my work.  The plug-in accomodates a home page, about page, contact page, one additional page of your choice, up to two external link pages, and up to 6 gallery pages.   You can modify text placement, fonts, all colors, and much more.  And it costs just 15 Euros, or USD $21  at today’s exchange rate!    This includes up to 9 downloads, so as Sean continues to refine the product, you can [...more]

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An Easier Way to Get Your Color in Lightroom

You are designing a slideshow, and you want the background color to be a particular color from one of your images.  Or, you are designing a web gallery, and you want the background color to be the color on your website, or some other cool color you have found.  The question is, how do you find out what that color is, and tell Lightroom to use it?   A while back I wrote a post on using Photoshop to identify the color, and then specifying this color in Lightroom.   It turns out though, that there is an easier way — you can do it all within Lightroom.  This is why I love Lightroom more every day — it just continues to [...more]

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