Where Are My Lightroom 4 or 5 Develop Controls and What’s That Lightning Bolt Below the Histogram?

If you have upgraded to Lightroom 5 from Lightroom 3 or earlier (even if you came via Lightroom 4), when you look at photos in the Develop module that came from Lightroom 3, you will see a lightning bolt below the histogram if the histogram is open, or to the left of the panel name if it is closed: The equivalent symbol in Lightroom 4 was an exclamation point below your photo: The lightning bolt  is a signal to you that the photo is continuing to use your settings from the old (pre-Lightroom 4) processing technology. The photo therefore should look the same to you as it did as you had left it in the earlier version of Lightroom (worked [...more]

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What’s New in Lightroom 4.1

In this video tutorial, learn about the new features in Lightroom 4.1: Color defringing in the Lens Corrections panel HDR file support Book output option to JPEG (my favorite!) Adobe Revel move to Publish Services (For higher quality, once you click on the play button, click on the sprocket wheel at the bottom of the screen and choose 720.) Related Post: Adobe Releases Lightroom 4.1

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How to Email Photos Directly from Lightroom 4 and Lightroom 5

Starting with Lightroom 4, you can email photos directly from Lightroom rather than having to export jpegs to your hard drive, and then outside of Lightroom, attach them to your email.  It has some limitations that I’ll discuss, but I find that it often saves me a lot of time. Select one or more photos that you want to email, from the filmstrip in any module in Lightroom or from the grid in the Library module, then right-click inside one of the selected photos and choose Email Photos. Lightroom can use the email program (“client”) on your computer, such as Outlook or Mac Mail, or any web email service, such as Gmail or AOL.  You will choose one or the [...more]

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What is that Exclamation Mark Below My Photo in Lightroom 4? If, When, and How to Upgrade to the New Process Version

If you have upgraded to Lightroom 4, when you look at photos in the Develop module that you had in a  previous version of Lightroom, you will see an exclamation point in the bottom right: This is a signal to you that the photo is continuing to use your settings from the old (pre-Lightroom 4) processing technology. The photo therefore should look the same to you as it did as you had left it in the earlier version of Lightroom (worked or unworked), and you will have the same Develop controls as before (for example, Recovery and Fill Light in the Basic panel, instead of Highlights, Shadows, Whites and Blacks.) The new Lightroom 4 controls/technology are called Process Version 2012; [...more]

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Adobe Releases Lightroom 4 with Dramatically Lower Pricing!

Adobe announced tonight the official release of Lightroom 4. The biggest news is the pricing — the full version lists for $149, and the upgrade and student/teacher additions are $79 (compared to $299/$199 for Lightroom 3!)  This will open up Lightroom to a much broader market, and make the upgrade decision an easier one. For me, the new more powerful Basic panel controls and new adjustment brush options alone are more than worth the upgrade. Buy from Adobe at this link. What has changed since the Beta release: Reverse geocoding Improved auto tone in Develop, tweaks to highlights, clarity and automatic chromatic Aberration Increased range of local white balance controls (temperature and tint) Re-added the Process Version checkbox in the [...more]

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Using the Lightroom 4 and 5 Basics Panel – Recommended Workflow and Video

UPDATE: While this was written during the Lightroom 4 beta release, these instructions and video are completely applicable to the official Lightroom 4 release and Lightroom 5! The Basics panel in the Develop module of the Lightroom 4 Beta may not be the sexiest feature, but the improvements are quite powerful, and the new controls are one of the few new features that you will use many times every day. Working successfully with them requires that you change how you work with the sliders. The keys to successful work are to (1) understand that Exposure is now midtone brightness rather than the white point, and (2) that the sliders are designed to be worked from top to bottom. Here is [...more]

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