Apr 102013
 

Lightroom HSL/ColorDo you want your skies bluer, faces less red, or other colors in your photo more or less intense or lighter or darker? In Lightroom this sometimes requires painting with the adjustment brush, but it often can be accomplished much more quickly with Lightroom’s HSL/Color panel.

In this video tutorial from my Lightroom 4: The Fundamentals & Beyond series (10 1/2 hours of training on 55 videos), I show how to use the HSL/Color panel in Develop to get dramatic results quickly. (This tutorial also applies to earlier versions of Lightroom.)

As usual, for higher quality, once you hit Play, click on the sprocket wheel in the bottom right and choose 720/HD.

Learn more about the complete video series, Lightroom 4: The Fundamentals & Beyond.


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Jul 142011
 

The HSL panel allows you to affect individual colors in your image.  HSL stands for Hue, Saturation, and Luminance.

You can use Hue to shift a color towards another color, for example,  blue to purple or green.  (Yes, you too can have purple skies!)  Saturation is the intensity of color, so you can make your blues, for example, more rich or more faded out.  Finally, Luminance is brightness.  Use it to brighten or darken a particular color.    Continue reading »

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Dec 072008
 

The adjustment brush and the graduated filter tool are wonderful additions to Lightroom 2 for making local changes. But there are often quicker ways to make local changes. I will talk about HSL in this post.

In the image below I want to darken the sky. Yes, I can get the adjustment brush, set the exposure to a negative amount, and paint the sky.

Before

Before

But since the only blue in the image is the sky, it is alot faster accomplish my goal by darkening the blues in the HSL/Color/Grayscale panel: click on HSL, click on luminance (luminance refers to brightness), and slide the blue slider to the left.

Darkening the Blues in The Image

Darkening the Blues in The Image

Darkened Blues

Darkened Blues

Let’s say I now want to saturate the grass and tree more. I can use the adjustment brush with a positive saturation setting, but instead, in the HSL panel I will click on Saturation.    I’m not sure if the grass is green or yellow or some combination, so instead of guessing and fooling around with the sliders, I’ll use the handy Targeted Adjustment Tool (TAT). I will click on it, and then click on the grass and drag upwards since I want to increase saturation. I will do this in a few places in the foreground.  The TAT detects the colors you are dragging on, and adjusts those throughout the image — in this case increasing saturation of yellows and greens.    It works for us here because there are no yellows and greens in the building or sky — otherwise those would become more saturated as well.

Saturated Foreground

Saturated Foreground

tat

The yellow is a little too saturated for me, but now it is easy to go to the Yellow slider and reduce it a little. Note also that I could have darkened the sky with the TAT as well, clicking on luminance and dragging downward on the sky, rather than using the blue slider.

Finally, I am going to use the Hue component in the HSL panel to change the color of the background in this image:

Before

Before

I click on HSL, Hue and the Targeted Adjustment tool, then click and drag up and/or down on the blue background to change the color to something I like. Because there was no blue in the subjects, they are unaffected.

After Hue Change

After Hue Change

By the way, if skin is too red, try clicking on saturation, and dragging downwards on the face to take some of the color out. In this case, since purple also contains red, it will change the background a little as well, but that may be acceptable, and a big time saver over working with the adjustment brush.

The key to being able to use HSL to do local adjustments is that the area you want to darken, lighten, increase or decrease saturation of, or change the color of, is made up of colors that don’t exist elsewhere in the image. In my first image, for example, if the building had also been blue, I could not have isolated the sky using HSL. I would have had to use the adjustment brush to specifically darken the sky.

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