Dec 012011
 

Occasionally I want to add  or subtract more clarity, contrast, or some other setting to or from the whole photo than the Lightroom Basic panel slider will allow.  At this point I often turn to the adjustment brush or graduated filter. They are intended for making local changes to a photo, but you can also apply them to the whole photo. They allow you to use the following settings:

lightroom adjustment brush graduated filter settings

If, for example, I need more than 100 of clarity on the whole photo, I would set the Basics panel slider to 100, and then using the adjustment brush or graduated filter, I would add more. Continue reading »

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Aug 012011
 

I posted this tip a little over a year ago when Lightroom 3 came out, but I thought I’d post it again, since surprisingly it is one of my most-read posts.

Looking to blur out a background to reduce distractions?  In Lightroom 3 or later, use the adjustment brush with Sharpness at -50 to -100.   If this is not enough blur, do it again:  click on New to start a new adjustment, and paint a second time.    If you blur out an object that you want to keep sharp, use the adjustment brush and paint back over the object with +100 Sharpness to restore its sharpness!

Also consider using the graduated filter with -100 Sharpness to simulate a shallower depth of field where the sharpness drops off gradually.

If you don’t know how to use the adjustment brush, here is an old video on it (that for better or worse requires that you have flash to play it).  It is a sample video from my Lightroom 3 DVD, but everything covered is also applicable to Lightroom 4, 5, 6 and CC (these newer versions of Lightroom do have additional features in the adjustment brush).

The adjustment brush, graduated filter and radial filter are covered in-depth in my Lightroom CC/6 and 5: The Fundamentals & Beyond video series (and earlier versions).


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Jun 202010
 

Looking to blur out a background to reduce distractions?  In Lightroom 3, use the adjustment brush with Sharpness at -100.   If this is not enough blur, do it again:  click on New to start a new adjustment, and paint a second time.

Also consider using the graduated filter with -100 Sharpness to simulate a shallower depth of field where the sharpness drops off gradually.   UPDATE:  If you blur out an object that you want to keep sharp, use the adjustment brush and paint back over the object with +100 Sharpness to restore its sharpness!

Is this cool, or what?

Here’s a video on how to use the adjustment brush in Lightroom.

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Dec 172008
 

Here’s a video I made showing how to use the graduated filter tool in Lightroom 2 and Camera Raw in CS4.

Update 2011:  This is one of my earliest videos, so please bear with its imperfections.  It is applicable to Lightroom 3 and Camera Raw in CS5 as well.

go to video

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