Shortcuts You Can’t Live Without: Lightroom Library Module

From my experience teaching, I know that some folks love shortcuts and others much prefer to use menus. But even if you are in the second group, you will find that learning and using just a handful or so of the most important shortcuts will really speed up your Lightroom experience. I dare say, you will not go back! G takes you to the Library Grid view E takes you to the Library Loupe view D takes you to the Develop Module Tab hides and reveals your left and right panels Shift-Tab hides and reveals both the panels and filmstrip hides and reveals the filter bar at the top. 0-5 assign 0 to 5 stars to your image. 6-9 assign […more]

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Most Used Shortcuts

Just a quick post for today, with my most used shortcuts. I can’t recommend these enough — they work everywhere, Photoshop, Camera Raw, Lightroom, and in places where other shortcuts don’t necessarily work, like in Photoshop filters. First, the left bracket key [ and right bracket key ] for decreasing and increasing brush size … paint brush, healing brush, clone stamp, adjustment brush, spot removal tool, eraser, etc, etc.. Don’t waste your time going into brush menus for this! Similarly, shift [ and shift ] control how soft or hard your brush is, in 20% increments. Second, for zooming in and out on an image, I use Ctl/Cmd + and Ctl/Cmd -. Again, in all of these programs. Holding the […more]

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The Scoop on Vibrance

If you have upgraded to Photoshop CS3 or CS4 or if use Lightroom, then you have encountered Vibrance. Consider it a smarter less heavy handed form of Saturation. Saturation will saturate all colors equally, and it is easy to go over the edge into blobs of frightening color and loss of detail in a color that was pretty saturated to start with, just to get the saturation up on another color that started out less saturated. Vibrance on the other hand will saturate less-saturated colors more than ones that are already more saturated. It will also protect somewhat against oversaturating skin tones. Consider this example. The first image is before adjustments. My goal is to increase the saturation of the […more]

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Photoshop Scrubby Sliders

Scrubby sliders are one of Photoshop’s great time saving features that you may not discover on your own. In many places in Photoshop, when you click and drag left or right on the name of a numeric setting, it adjusts the setting down or up — with no need to go into drop down boxes or to type in numbers. As an example, you may have worked with layer opacity, a setting in the layers palette that allows you to reduce the strength or opacity of a layer. The slow way to adjust the opacity is to click on the right facing drop down arrow to the right of 100%, and then adjust the slider that appears: Th quick way […more]

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Lightroom 2 Adjustment Brush Tip

If you are using the adjustment brush to make local image enhancements, you can hover over the pin to see the mask that you have drawn, but it shows for just a moment. To keep it on as you brush, type the letter O, for Overlay. To turn the overlay off, type O again. If instead you use the adjustment brush in Camera Raw, simply check the Show Mask check box to see the mask. (Why isn’t this check box in Lightroom?)

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