Laura Shoe

Nov 192008
 

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to have your thumbnails on one screen, and your full size image on another? Lightroom 1 users thought so and pressed Adobe to provide this functionality. Adobe did so in Lightroom 2. It is very easy to set up: In the Library and Develop modules, on the left side just above the filmstrip, you will see icons for screen 1 and screen 2:

Dual Monitor Buttons

Dual Monitor Buttons

Click on the 2 icon, and a second LR window will open that looks like this:

Secondary Monitor Display

Secondary Monitor Display

Drag this to your second monitor and size the window to fit.

Your keyboard shortcuts (G=Grid, E=Loupe, C=Compare, N=Survey, D=Develop) still control what you see on your primary monitor.

In the secondary display, in the top left are your options for this display: Grid, Loupe, Compare or Survey. If you choose Loupe, you will see three options to the right: Normal, Live and Locked. Normal works as expected — when you click on an image thumbnail in your grid or filmstrip, the image is displayed on the second monitor. With Live, as you hover over a thumbnail, the image is displayed on the second monitor — you can quickly review one image after another by moving the mouse over each thumbnail. With locked, the image displayed will stay on the screen even when you then choose another one for your primary screen. This is useful for comparing images — for example, on your primary screen you may be working on an image in Develop, and you want to make sure that you set its white balance to have a look consistent with another image. To set it up, select the second image, and on the secondary monitor choose Loupe and Locked. Now select the one you want to work on in Develop for the primary screen.

For those of you who calibrate your monitors (hopefully all of you!), be sure it is your primary monitor that is calibrated, and make all judgments on color and tone from this display.

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Nov 172008
 

You’re on vacation, at a workshop or shooting on location commercially, loading your images onto your laptop and working them in Lightroom. Will you be able to successfully and easily transfer all your Lightroom work to your desktop Lightroom catalog? Absolutely!  This method will transfer everything you may have done — keywords, flags, stars, color labels, other metadata, as well as Develop settings, collections and virtual copies.

Let’s say your folder of images on your laptop is named “Vacation”. In the Library module in Lightroom, right-click on the folder name, and choose Export This Folder as a Catalog. Choose a location to store this temporary catalog. I recommend the desktop because it will be easy for you to find. Another option is to save it directly to an external hard drive that you can then use to transfer the catalog to your desktop. Choose a name for the catalog, like Vacation Catalog. Checking Export Negative Files will bundle a copy of the originals with the catalog so that you don’t have to move them over separately to your desktop and then have to have LR find them. I recommend that you do choose this option. Checking Include Available Previews will save and transfer the jpeg previews that have already been built. If you don’t, LR on your desktop computer will simply regenerate them — it just takes time that you have already spent for them to be generated on your laptop. Finally, click Save.

This process generates a folder called Vacation Catalog that has all the components in it. Move the folder to an external hard drive and connect it to your desktop computer. (Another option is to save the folder to a DVD and then insert this in your desktop computer.) In the Library module of Lightroom, in the menu bar go to File>Import from Catalog. In the dialog box, navigate to the Vacation Catalog folder on the external drive or DVD, double click on it to open it, and select the Vacation Catalog.lrcat file (it will be the only file that is not in a subfolder). Click Choose.

In the Import Dialog that then opens, under File Handling choose Copy Files to a New Location and Import, click Choose and navigate to the folder you want to store the images in permanently (like 20080701 New Mexico Vacation within the folder 2008). Click Import.

Done! Assuming everything went well with the import and your images and LR enhancements are there:

1.  Delete the Vacation Catalog folder that you transfered over.

2. Back on your laptop, remove the Vacation folder of images from the LR catalog and the hard drive. In the LR Library module, right click on the folder and choose Show in Explorer (Finder on a Mac). In Explorer or Finder, delete the folder. Back in Lightroom, right click again on the folder and select Remove, to remove it from the catalog.

Happy travels!

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Nov 122008
 

I’ll be out of town for the rest of the week teaching a Lightroom 2 workshop in Eugene, Oregon. Please check back on Monday for my next post. Remember, if there is a topic or question you would like me to address, click on “Submit a Question” to the right, and email it to me — I would love to hear from you.

Thanks for dropping by!

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Nov 122008
 

I was creating a web gallery in Lightroom today for a friend, and I wanted it to look as consistent with her website as possible in terms of colors and fonts. The issue I faced was how to determine what the website background color was. Here’s how to do it using Photoshop (UPDATE – click here to learn how you can do this in Lightroom):

  • Open up Photoshop, open any image and make sure you have the background layer highlighted in the layers palette.
  • Resize the Photoshop window so that the web page (or any other document) you want the color from is next to it.
  • Grab the Eyedropper tool (shortcut I), click anywhere in the image, and then drag over onto the web page color you want. As you drag around, you will see that the foreground color in Photoshop’s tool palette changes to reflect the color you are over. Let go when you have sampled the color you want.
  • Click on the foreground color swatch in the tool palette to open the Color Picker dialog. Write down the 6 digit hexadecimal color code (circled below):
Photoshop Color Picker Dialog Box

Photoshop Color Picker Dialog Box

Here is how to use the color in a Lightroom web gallery:

  • In the Web module Color Palette, click on the background color, and when the color dialog box opens, click in the hex box and type the new number in. That’s it!
Changing a Lightroom Web Gallery Color

Changing a Lightroom Web Gallery Color

Once you have your web gallery designed, don’t forget to create a template, so that you can use the design again without having to start over from scratch. More on that in another post.

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Nov 092008
 

When you are working on an image for print, or any application where it will be viewed full size, it is important that you zoom in to 100%, and inspect the entire image for issues that you can’t see when it is smaller. I was working on this image today

Fall Image

Fall Image

and when I zoomed in to 100% I discovered a red and cyan colored fringe around the bird in the image. Here it is zoomed in to 400% so you can really see it: Continue reading »

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Nov 062008
 

From my experience teaching, I know that some folks love shortcuts and others much prefer to use menus. But even if you are in the second group, you will find that learning and using just a handful or so of the most important shortcuts will really speed up your Lightroom experience. I dare say, you will not go back!

G takes you to the Library Grid view

E takes you to the Library Loupe view

D takes you to the Develop Module

Tab hides and reveals your left and right panels

Shift-Tab hides and reveals both the panels and filmstrip

hides and reveals the filter bar at the top.

0-5 assign 0 to 5 stars to your image.

6-9 assign colors to your image.

B assigns the selected image to the Quick Collection

If you are really into shortcuts, in Lightroom go to Help>Library Module Shortcuts to see a list of many more.

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